Packaging Digest Feature of Evanesce: Sustainable Packaging That’s Baked to Compostable Perfection

Packaging Digest Feature of Evanesce

Founder & CEO Douglas Horne shares our innovative Evanesce® Molded Starch technology in his in-depth interview with Packaging Digest Editor, Rick Lingle. This feature also appeared in Plastics Today.

Sustainable Packaging That’s Baked to Compostable Perfection

A dough made from starch, fiber, and little else that’s baked into compostable packaging using Evanesce Packaging Solutions’ patented technology is a breakthrough recipe for sustainable packaging.

Company founder Douglas Horne was an elected government official in British Columbia, Canada, when he came across the technology. It so profoundly changed his way of thinking about packaging that it prompted Horne to change careers.

“At that time, I felt that we should ban expanded polystyrene (EPS) packaging because of this elegant alternative solution,” he relates. “The technology is so fantastic I left politics to acquire it then surrounded myself with great people to take it to a commercial level. One of the things that always worried me as a regulator was the fact that many of the products that were considered sustainable weren’t. This is.”

The packaging is a molded starch-and-fiber product uniquely different than anything else including thermoformed fiber products, according to Horne. “It looks and feels like a traditional thermoformed plastic tray.”

The word evanesce means to disappear. “That defines the company and our product: Evanesce Molded Starch technology is the essence of what we do,” he explains.

We unpack the technology as highlights Horne provided in a recent interview.

Competitively priced sustainable packaging.

Brands, retailers, and consumers are looking for more sustainable options at a competitive price.

“EPS and other plastics have done so well in the market is because they’re inexpensive, versatile, and can be made into many shapes and forms,” says Horne. “Our products are comparable, though perhaps slightly higher in cost because of the value-added attributes.”

Continue reading the full story here.